Central Texas COG (Belton)

Free

August 4, 2021

Mass shootings attacks are becoming all too common. Agencies big and small have had active assailant incidents. While no amount of training could genuinely prepare a Telecommunicator for the overwhelming events of an actual active assailant incident, this training will help the Telecommunicator understand the importance of moving through each call, gathering pertinent information, and recognizing hazards for responders, callers, and bystanders.

Central Texas COG (Belton)

August 23-25, 2021

This course will give the Texas TC basic knowledge of Texas Criminal Laws. The course will be updated with 2021 Legislative Updates. This course DOES NOT meet the Texas Peace Officer Law Update requirement and is not intended for police officers.

West Central Texas COG (Abilene)

Free

September 2, 2021

Mass shootings attacks are becoming all too common. Agencies big and small have had active assailant incidents. While no amount of training could genuinely prepare a Telecommunicator for the overwhelming events of an actual active assailant incident, this training will help the Telecommunicator understand the importance of moving through each call, gathering pertinent information, and recognizing hazards for responders, callers, and bystanders.

Texoma COG (Sherman)

Free

October 5, 2021

Understanding mental illness is the first step in successfully processing a call regarding a person with mental illness. This course will explain basic types of mental illness, describe the warning signs of each, and determine questions and instructions for callers with mental illness.

Texoma COG (Sherman)

Free

October 6, 2021

Understanding mental illness is the first step in successfully processing a call regarding a person with mental illness. This course will explain basic types of mental illness, describe the warning signs of each, and determine questions and instructions for callers with mental illness.

West Central Texas COG (Abilene)

Free

November 2, 2021

TCs receive a variety of calls considered "routine." This can lead to complacency. TCs must be prepared for any call to become dangerous in the "blink of an eye." Recognizing areas of complacency is key in ensuring responder safety. This is a hard topic, but unfortunately necessary.